Putting training into action

 Putting training into action

 

Unlike toothpicks, cotton balls or cooking pans, training can’t be kept in storage for a long time. You either use it or lose it. Everyone knows that unless what was learned is translated into on-the-job behavior there will be no real benefit from training. You could return from training all motivated and excited to apply what you learned only to face pre-existing patterns of thought and behavior in the workplace that may work against implementing the new ideas. You could return from training all motivated and excited to apply what you learned only to face pre-existing patterns of thought and behavior in the workplace that may work against implementing the new ideas.

As a team leader, manager or trainer to help put training into action and help trainees and employees go beyond the obstacles of pre-existing workplace culture issues and to create more suitable conditions to transfer learning from the classroom to the workplace, follow and encourage others to do some or all of the steps below:

 

Create the expectation beforehand

Before sending employees to training, sit and talk with them about why they enrolled in the class and what do they expect to learn and how can they use it back on the job. Creating this expectation beforehand increases trainees’ use of what they learn.

 

Encourage teach backs

When someone teaches back what he/she learned, two things are likely to happen. This will reinforce the learning and they are more likely to remember what they learned and they will also put that learning into practice.

 

Create an action plan

Put any skill into practice, for example, if you learn a new approach of giving employees written feedback, establish a goal to document 3 feedback sessions a week after the training or make it a goal to write six notes of praise to your employees.

 

Ask for training aids

Ask trainers for helpful charts, cards, models and similar devices that serve as quick reminders of core elements of a training concepts and techniques or create your own little cards with keywords or simple models or acronyms that can both remind you and prompt you to practice what you were taught

 

Keep a record

To gauge effectiveness of applying new skills learned, record when you applied the new tools and techniques, the results you obtained, benefits experienced and obstacles encountered.

 

Utilize other professional development opportunities

Professional development takes many forms in addition to formal training. These include rotations, special tasks, delegation, reading assignments ..etc. So consider other forms and opportunities for people development in addition to formal training.

 

Ask them what they learned

Immediately upon returning from training, ask employees what they learned and how they plan to use it on the job. Discuss what changes they need to make and how can you help them implement and apply what was learned back on the job.

Unlike toothpicks, cotton balls or cooking pans, training can’t be kept in storage for a long time. You either use it or lose it. Everyone knows that unless what was learned is translated into on-the-job behavior there will be no real benefit from training. You could return from training all motivated and excited to apply what you learned only to face pre-existing patterns of thought and behavior in the workplace that may work against implementing the new ideas.