Steps to reduce stress for your staff

There is a range of actions you can take as managers which could be of use in reducing stress for your staff:-

• Provide/Increase opportunities for staff to control their work; establish their own priorities.

• Plan all changes together or to whatever extent possible.

• Keep in constant touch, define limits of work tasks and give support in accomplishing tasks.

• Treat a collective goal as a target – not a staff competition to establish who is best or worst.

• Provide an atmosphere where there are opportunities to talk things over whenever needed.

• Recognise that anger is part of everyone’s personality and reduce your own. By dealing constructively with rising aggression you can improve your communication and problem solving skills.

• Encourage staff not to be consumed by their career objectives.

• Give honest performance appraisals and help staff to make self-assessments so that they do not move to posts to which they are unsuited.

• Reduce organisational uncertainty; protect staff from worry about events over which they have no control.

• Ensuring working conditions are healthy and reasonably pleasant.

 

As someone who is managed you can help contribute to your own well-being by:-

• Avoid having a too rigid schedule. When possible, vary it and eliminate most of the self-imposed deadlines.

• Trying to develop a positive attitude. Force yourself to see every event in its most positive light.

• Listing those events which cause you stress and identify what is about each event that is causing stress. Map out a strategy for consciously attempting to lessen the stress each time the events occur.

• Getting on with the task to get it over with rather than worrying yourself sick about it.

 

Healthy coping at work involves:-

• Really knowing yourself, understanding and accepting your own strengths and weaknesses. Knowing those personality factors that cannot be changed and those skills, professional and social, on which to capitalise.

• Having interests outside work which are regularly pursued, so that you can get a variety of satisfaction from life.

• Reacting in different ways to stressful events –

o You don’t always develop a headache when angry with your boss or become depressed when faced with an apparently minor threat.
o Not always hyperactive or frozen by incapacity under stressful conditions.
o Bouncing back quickly from stress reactions.

• Acknowledging that others have different values, different ways of doing things; accepting this as a fact of life without attempting to build others over in his/her image.

• Being active and productive at work without sacrificing your outside work activity.

 

For more on managing time and stress, check out our instant download Time Management customizable training package.